Protest & Repression Around the Globe
A roundtable discussion on Hong Kong, Thailand, Russia, & Belarus

Natalya Chernyshova

Senior Lecturer Modern History, Uni. of Winchester

Nina Khrushcheva

Prof. International Affairs, The New School

Claudio Sopranzetti

Assistant Prof., Central European University

Jeffrey Wasserstrom

Chancellor's Prof of History, UC Irvine

Marian Repnikova (Moderator)

Assistant Prof., Georgia State University

March 10, 2021 10:00 AM    Webinar

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Over the past two years, there have been massive citizen-led protests in Hong Kong, Thailand, Russia, and Belarus — as well as major acts of repression by their governments. Join us for a roundtable discussion that will zoom into these four countries, focusing on the similarities and differences between the two pairs of locales: Hong Kong and Thailand, and Russia and Belarus. 

Our panel of experts include Natalya Chernyshova, Senior Lecturer in Modern History at the University of Winchester who will discuss Belarus; Nina Khrushcheva, Professor in the Julien J. Studley Graduate Programs of International Affairs at The New School who will discuss Russia; Claudio Sopranzetti, Assistant Professor in Anthropology at Central European University who will discuss Thailand; and Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Chancellor's Professor of History, UC Irvine, who will discuss Hong Kong. The conversation will be led by Maria Repnikova, Assistant Professor in Global Communication at Georgia State University, and will explore the possibilities of these citizen-led protests, and whether there have been — or will be — any major changes in government leadership, culture, or international relations within the four locations. 

Thank you to our event partners - UCI Forum for the Academy and the Public, Wende Museum, Central European University Democracy Institute, the Index on Censorship, and the World Affairs Council of Orange County.

        


 

Natalya Chernyshova is Senior Lecturer in Modern History at University of Winchester, UK. She is the author of the monograph Soviet Consumer Culture in the Brezhnev Era (Routledge, 2013) and articles on Belarusian and late Soviet history. This year, she is a recipient of the British Academy Mid-Career Fellowship to write a political biography of Petr Masherau, First Secretary of the Belarusian Communist party during 1965-1980. She has also written on the protests in Belarus for PONARS Eurasia and History Today. Natalya has a BA from the American University in Bulgaria and a BA in Modern Foreign Languages (with Distinction) from the Minsk State Linguistic University. She received her MA (with Merit) in European Studies and her PhD in History from King's College London. Natalya’s previous professional experience includes serving as editor of the Belarus Reporting Service at the Institute for War and Peace Reporting in London and working at IREX ProMedia in Minsk, Belarus.  

Nina Khrushcheva is Professor in the Julien J. Studley Graduate Programs of International Affairs at The New School. She is a senior fellow of the World Policy Institute and an editor of and a contributor to Project Syndicate: Association of Newspapers Around the World. After receiving her Ph.D. from Princeton University, she had a two-year appointment as a research fellow at the School of Historical Studies of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton and then served as Deputy Editor of East European Constitutional Review at the NYU School of Law. She is a member of Council on Foreign Relations, a recipient of Great Immigrants: The Pride of America Award from Carnegie Corporation of New York in 2013 and of a 2019 Gold Medal of Honorary Patronage from Trinity College Dublin. Her articles have appeared in Foreign Policy, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Financial Times and other publications. She is the author of Imagining Nabokov: Russia Between Art and Politics (Yale UP, 2008) and The Lost Khrushchev: A Journey Into the Gulag of the Russian Mind (Tate, 2014). Her latest co-authored book is In Putin's Footsteps: Searching for the Soul of an Empire Across Russia's Eleven Time Zones (St. Martin's Press, 2019).

Claudio Sopranzetti's research interests sit at the nexus of theorizations of capitalism, urbanism, and social movements in Southeast Asia and Southern Europe. He received his PhD in Social Anthropology from Harvard University in 2013 and, before moving to CEU, held a postdoctoral research fellowship at All Souls College, Oxford University. He is the author of two academic books, Red Journeys: Inside the Thai Red Shirts Movement (Silkworm and Washington University Press, 2012) and Owners of the Map: Motorcycle Taxi Drivers, Mobility, and Politics in Bangkok (University of California Press 2018), which was awarded the 2019 Margaret Mead Award. In 2019 he published King of Bangkok (ADD Editore) his first anthropological graphic novel, in collaboration with visual artist Sara Fabbri and editor Chiara Natalucci. The book was translated in Thai in 2020 and received the Editor Choice Award. Claudio also writes regularly for Al Jazeera and other international media outlets and activists publications. Currently, he is conducting a new research project on class fragmentation and recomposition in Italy, titled The Making of the Italian Precariat and a collaborative research on neo-fascist organizations. 

Jeffrey Wasserstrom is Chancellor’s Professor of History at the University of California, Irvine, where he also holds courtesy appointment in Law and Literary Journalism. He is the author of five previous books, including China in the 21st Century: What Everyone Needs to Know (co-authored by Maura Elizabeth Cunningham) and Eight Juxtapositions: China through Imperfect Analogies from Mark Twain to Manchukuo. He is an adviser to the Hong Kong International Literary Festival and a former member of the Board of Directors of the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations.

Maria Repnikova (moderator) is a scholar of China’s political communication. Maria speaks fluent Mandarin, Russian and Spanish. Dr. Repnikova is an Assistant Professor in Global Communication at Georgia State University. This year she is a Wilson Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson Center for Scholar.  In the past, Maria was a post-doctoral fellow at the Project for Advanced Research in Global Communication at the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania. She received her doctorate (DPhil) in Politics at the University of Oxford where she was a Rhodes Scholar.